About

Mormon Stories podcast is dedicated to exploring, celebrating, and challenging Mormon culture in constructive ways.  The podcast is conducted in the spirit of the Mormon Stories Shared Values:

  1. We acknowledge the richness of Mormon heritage, teachings, and community in all of its diversity.
  2. We believe that one can self-identify as Mormon based on one’s genealogy, upbringing, beliefs, relationships, and other life experiences, regardless of one’s adherence or non-adherence to the teachings or doctrines of any religious organization.
  3. We seek spaces where we as Mormons can live lives of intellectual and spiritual integrity, individual conscience, and personal dignity.
  4. We acknowledge and honor different spiritual paths and modes of religious or non-religious truth-seeking.  We respect the convictions of those who subscribe to ideas and beliefs that differ from our own.
  5. We recognize the confusion, distress, emotional trauma, and social ostracism that people on faith journeys often experience.  We seek constructive ways of helping and supporting people, regardless of their ultimate decisions regarding church affiliation or activity.
  6. We affirm the inherent and equal worth of all human beings.  We seek spaces where Mormons (and all people) can interact as equals regardless of race, gender, or sexual orientation.  In this spirit of egalitarianism, we prefer non-authoritarian and non-hierarchical means of organization and affiliation.

In addition to explicitly striving to align all operations with the Mormon Stories Shared Values, we endeavor to ensure that the projects we undertake 1) support individuals in Mormon-related faith crises, 2) save marriages, 3) heal families, and 4) celebrate, challenge, and advance Mormon culture in healthy ways.

We recognize that our goals are lofty and that we consistently fall short of our own ideals.  We continue in the pursuit of what we hope will empower individuals, strengthen family relationships, and forward healthy Mormon culture despite our imperfections because we believe that goodness and happiness will come from our efforts.  At the same time, we acknowledge our own ineptitude and see the advantages of maintaining flexibility in our programming and decision-making.  Your feedback is therefore important to us. Please let us know when and how we’ve missed the mark and what you can do to help make Mormon Stories better.  Please email us at MormonStories@gmail.com.

19 comments for “About

  1. Steve Mayne
    February 9, 2010 at 3:52 pm

    John,
    I just visited you blog website as I have over the past couple of years, and I was so pleased to see that you are going to continue with your interviews. I carry several of them on my PDA and listen to them from time to time. I especially liked the Ted Lyon and Glen Kearney interviews. I listened to most of the other interviews, and some of them made me a little uncomfortable, but I guess that is the price of learning. I hope you continue for a long time with the same unbiased approach even though some subjects make guys like me squirm a little. I am sending a donation and though small, I hope it helps to keep you going.
    Sincerely,

    Steve Mayne

  2. Trevor Rasmussen
    September 28, 2010 at 3:08 pm

    John,

    If I would have come across this site a year ago I think I’d still be married. Even though I’m one of the unfortunate guys who’s wife leaves him because of disbelief in the LDS church your podcasts and workshops are helping me rebuild some broken bridges with the ex wife and making a better environment to raise our son.

    I wish more people in Utah(family and old in-laws) had the same honest and fair attitude as yours. I hope someday I can share my personal story to the world and better the lives of others like you have so done.

    I’m in the military stationed in England and people thank me all the time for serving the United States and the United Kingdom so I’d like to take this opportunity to say thank you for all you do and your service to better the community. Because of your website I’m much happier and I have a better outlook on life. I’m able to keep pressing on so I can do my best to perform my military duties.
    Thank you very much,
    Trevor

  3. Ryan
    December 16, 2010 at 12:26 pm

    John,

    I was introduced to your podcast by a good friend of mine. It was during a time that I was exploring my faith, spirituality, and religion. I am so thankful for what you do and for offering more than just the “three hour block” to those of us who want it. I find that whether or not I agree with anyone’s position on a given topic it allows me to explore where others are coming from. I have since been introduced to various doctrine by all of the notable LDS scholars like Hugh Nibley, Richard Bushman, etc… Anyways, I am in the military (active duty) and I know your podcast will help me through some difficult times in Afghanistan next year. Thanks John and PLEASE don’t stop these podcasts! (p.s. I am now a paid subscriber! yesssssss!)

  4. February 7, 2011 at 8:24 pm

    hi John,
    Thanks for your good and hard word on these Mormon issues. You are trully helping many many people all over the country and the world. Thanks to your job, it inspired me to open my own blog in portuguese and raise some of these questions in my own language in Brazil.
    I would like to know if have you ever thought in having a section in your blog dedicated in refer to other similar blogs, like a links page?
    Thanks!

    http://diariohistoriasud.blogspot.com/

  5. March 18, 2011 at 4:15 am

    Interesting site! You seem to have very balanced, respectful discussions on some divisive subjects. I have a lot of respect for anyone who can do that.

  6. Anonymous
    August 19, 2011 at 5:13 pm

    I listened to your presentation “Why people leave the LDS Church…” and wanted to tell you that you certainly have great insight. I am a university professor, former bishop, high councilman, early morning seminary teacher, etc. and, yet, 7 years ago I began to do consulting in the Middle East. At that time I was a ward missionary and I had extensive discussions with my Muslim friends. A long story, but as a result I began to seriously question the Church. The first time I expressed my concerns to my priesthood leader (i was his 1st assistant), his response was to tell me that he would have to release me. I was subsequently released as a home teacher via email, which told me i was not worthy. This followed with about 5 years of trying to be inactive. My wife, however, is the unquestioning, loving, devoted person that would never doubt. I have really struggled with my beliefs, but am attending and now participating again. I appreciated listening to your presentation and the insight it had. I sent the link to my wife and current bishop.

    • Anonymous
      August 19, 2011 at 5:32 pm

      swalston,

      Thank you so much for sharing. Your story is an important one.

      John

  7. Anonymous
    August 19, 2011 at 5:13 pm

    I listened to your presentation “Why people leave the LDS Church…” and wanted to tell you that you certainly have great insight. I am a university professor, former bishop, high councilman, early morning seminary teacher, etc. and, yet, 7 years ago I began to do consulting in the Middle East. At that time I was a ward missionary and I had extensive discussions with my Muslim friends. A long story, but as a result I began to seriously question the Church. The first time I expressed my concerns to my priesthood leader (i was his 1st assistant), his response was to tell me that he would have to release me. I was subsequently released as a home teacher via email, which told me i was not worthy. This followed with about 5 years of trying to be inactive. My wife, however, is the unquestioning, loving, devoted person that would never doubt. I have really struggled with my beliefs, but am attending and now participating again. I appreciated listening to your presentation and the insight it had. I sent the link to my wife and current bishop.

  8. Clayadi
    September 4, 2011 at 7:04 am

    These interviews are boring.  Why don’t you go back to San Jose Pinula, Guatemala to baptize all those little poor kids that lived in the slums outside the town, as you used to do.    Remember how you started the first Branch in that town by baptizing only the poorest of the poor & how you were affraid of Knocking doors at the Middle class houses in the town? 

  9. Stefany Clark
    October 28, 2011 at 9:35 am

    What’s the of purpose of establishing support communities? 

  10. Mark
    May 9, 2012 at 2:09 pm

    I am a fully active, fully believing member of the LDS church who loves to study and consider. I have enjoyed and continue to enjoy many of the podcasts you provide. My comment is that over time my experience with this site is that it is becoming more and more negative, not sure that is the correct word – i then looked at your board of directors and saw why – all but one are in some way negative toward the LDS faith – it would seem that this site would be better balanced if you had a greater representation of fully active believers.
    I enjoy the site but see it slipping away from its postive nature and becoming a site about creating doubt and subtly destroying faith rather than just sharing stories.

    thanks for what you do, just some thoughts.

    • Randy
      August 7, 2012 at 7:13 pm

      I’m a very active LDS priesthood holder and came across this site by clicking an ad on Facebook. Facebook ads can be targeted to any demographic you wish. In this case it was for those of the LDS faith apparently. I read about the upcoming conference in San Francisco for LGBTAQ LDS Members. Quite frankly I wasn’t sure there were enough to merit a conference, nevertheless I thought it was admirable. As I read on I was wondering the same as you noted, Mark. I’m not sure how positive and neutral this site is, but if it has an agenda to slowly weaken the faith of those who are LDS, then indeed it certainly not a site for me or any other good standing LDS person.

  11. Mac McDonald
    May 13, 2012 at 4:44 am

    Very interesting. Very happy to find you via a post on The Mormon Curtain.

  12. January 19, 2013 at 7:03 am

    I agree with Mark. What the world needs more of is the ability to have empathy for one another. That empathy cannot come from a negative approach to one another, regardless of what position we are blessed to hold.

    I was personally agnostic for a very long time until I was baptized on my 40th birthday. Since then, I have learned many things. The two that help the most are that I am only responsible for me – and that no one else is, and that the commandment to “judge not” is universal.

    I look forward to listening more to your podcast and to watching your website.

  13. February 4, 2015 at 5:17 pm

    I stumbled onto mormonstories about three weeks ago. I’ve been listening to your old podcasts and have found them very interesting. One of my faves was your interview with Rabbi Falcon. Neat guy!

  14. Luigi Di Benedetto
    January 25, 2016 at 5:24 am

    Hello Brother John; it’s Luigi from Australia and could yousend me some dvds as mentioned on your webiste to

    Luigi Di Bnenedetto
    Cambria Street
    Reids Flat NSW 2586
    Australia

    Thank You

    Luigi

    PS: Just read that you got booted out from the Mormon Church. You are welcome to my home in Australia for a sabbatical and anyone that could do with one.

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